Thank you very much for your interest in NAIHC. We are a 501(c)(3) nonstock nonprofit organization and appreciate any and all donations/contributions.

If you wish to contribute to NAIHC so we may continue with our vision, please make your check payable to NAIHC and send to:

NAIHC

PO Box 232

Oregon, WI 53575


Again, thank you very much for your support.

Erwin A. "Bud" Sholts, Chairman

 

 

The News

Opponents Block Kentucky’s Popular Industrial Hemp Bill

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NAIHC.orgMarch 12, 2013 – In February the Kentucky Senate voted 31-6 in favor of industrial hemp legislation following an 11-1 vote by the Kentucky Senate Agriculture Committee. Then last week the Kentucky House Agriculture Committee voted 24-1 for the bill championed by Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer, a Republican. But Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo, a Democrat, is denying the bill a House floor vote. The Kentucky bill would create a state regulatory framework for growing hemp in Kentucky whenever the crop is legalized nationally.

Read more: Opponents Block Kentucky’s Popular Industrial Hemp Bill

 

NAIHC Board Members Back Kentucky Industrial Hemp Bill

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NAIHC.orgMarch 5 , 2013 – Four North American Industrial Hemp Council (NAIHC) board members have been instrumental in efforts to have Kentucky lead the nation in re-commercializing industrial hemp.

Former CIA Director R. James Woolsey, North Dakota state representative Dave Monson, retired Kentucky tobacco grower Gale Glenn, and Prof. Paul Mahlberg, a long-time cannabis researcher, all provided expert testimony in Kentucky’s legislative hearings over the past month on creating a state regulatory framework for growing industrial hemp whenever the crop is legalized nationally. Read more about the Kentucky legislation.

Read more: NAIHC Board Members Back Kentucky Industrial Hemp Bill

 

Industrial Hemp Bills Gain Ground in U.S. House & Senate

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NAIHC.orgFebruary 15, 2013 – The two-page ‘‘Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013’’ has been introduced in both the U.S. House and Senate with strong bi-partisan support. The bills have a simple objective: legalize what once was a valuable U.S. crop by establishing that “The term ‘marihuana’ does not include industrial hemp” and amending the 1970 federal Controlled Substances Act “to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of marihuana.”

The current U.S. drug policy ruling is that all cannabis varieties, including industrial hemp, are treated as Schedule I controlled substances under the Controlled Substances Act.

Read more: Industrial Hemp Bills Gain Ground in U.S. House & Senate

   

CRS Report on “Hemp as an Agricultural Commodity”

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NAIHC.orgDec. 18, 2012 - The nonpartisan Congressional Research Service has issued a 26-page report on “Hemp as an Agricultural Commodity.” The Dec. 2012 CRS report warns that if proposed legislation ends the current U.S. ban on growing industrial hemp, U.S. hemp production would face stiff competition from established global suppliers including Canada and China. The report concludes, however, that “the U.S. market for hemp-based products has a highly dedicated and growing demand base, as indicated by recent U.S. market and import data for hemp products and ingredients . . .”

Read more: CRS Report on “Hemp as an Agricultural Commodity”

 

Industrial Hemp: A New Beginning

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NAIHC.org - In a report prepared for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Drug Enforcement Administration, and the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, the North American Industrial Hemp Council offers detailed recommendations designed to:

  • give American farmers an environmentally friendly non-food crop which can improve crop rotations and rural economic development,

  • give American businesses a domestic fiber for environmentally friendly uses ranging from car interior panels and building materials to food products and biofuels.

    Read more: Industrial Hemp: A New Beginning

   

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